The Intern Diaries (4): The In's and Out's of Netgalley


 After my first internship at a literary agency, I put together a free-flowing post about what I learned. Well, now that I am at Bloomsbury, I want to do the same thing as I go, but share it with my readers since I'm quickly discovering that many of you aspire to do the same thing that I am doing now! With 5 months under my belt and several more to go, I think now's a good time to start recording my thoughts! This post series will be posted on Sunday's whenever I get the time.


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I got a few questions about Netgalley, so I just wanted to post about it to hopefully clear things up in all areas!

Here is something that I learned and never really realized as a blogger in regards to Netgalley...many titles have a limited amount of people that are allowed to download it. Those messages you get about there not being enough eARCs are actually real!

And I know you're sitting there thinking it's an eARC, it's not physical, so why is there a limit? And there's a limit because, like ARCs, eARCs are meant to be read by a certain audience with certain kinds of platforms to get the word out there.

As an intern, I do man the Netgally account for review requests and media professional requests. Yes, these are two different things. If you are a blogger, you should characterize yourself as a reviewer, by the way. It's important that you do this. There are certain titles with important caps that I can't touch, but otherwise I am told to simply look at the blogs and use my best judgment while staying within a certain statistic or expectation range.

So, some Netgalley pieces of advice... (I'm assuming they extend to Edelweiss, too!)

1. Make sure your blog links work.
So many requests filter in on a single day that we can't go googling for your blog. You have the option to link a website, so link your platform's website! After linking it, go back in and check to make sure you linked it properly, because when we try to click sometimes and we are taken to an error page because a letter or a dot is missing in the URL, you're most likely going to get denied for not having a platform.

2. Goodreads does not count as a platform.
Do not link your Goodreads account. People with only a Goodreads account linked are more likely to get denied. If you have a blog and a Goodreads you can link both, but the blog is more important!

3. Do not request books if you have no platform.
If you have no platform whatsoever and you just like to read, Netgalley is probably not the place for you.

4. Do not request books if you haven't blogged for months.
We do actually click the links you provide for us and check out your blogs. If your first post is dated from months ago, if not years ago, you are going to get denied. Just because you once had a blog does not mean you can still reap the benefits if you are not still active. :(

5. Do not request books that are out of your territory.
Seriously, it's not like we hate people that don't live in the US or Canada, but there are different branches of a publishing house that work with different territories. For example, Australian bloggers requesting US titles are probably going to get denied by the US but approved by the Australian branch. Just listen to the guidelines that say what territories the posting is for. You're hurting your approval/deny ratio if you don't listen and publishers do see that when they are approving people and, for some, that can make or break a random click.

6. When submitting Netgalley reviews, update your review with your blog link when the title goes live.
Do not link to your Goodreads or Amazon or blog in general, we want to read the review once it is live so we can help promote it and note it in our files etc etc. Just going in to update the review can help the publisher immensely and if you make a habit of it your name may just become something people recognize automatically, which is always a good thing.

7. Don't think that you won't get approved for books on Netgalley because you're a smaller blogger.
If anything, you are more likely to get approved on Netgalley than you are a physical ARC as a smaller blogger! Sure, there are frontlist insanity titles that have such small approval ratios you may not get, but you will have access to most titles as long as you are blogging consistently and purposefully. I'm not saying start requesting books after a month of blogging because that doesn't show the consistancy people are looking for when approving Netgalley requests, but once you're in it for 2-3 months and have a small amount of followers, go for it!

8. Submitting reviews is always a good thing!
It ups your review ratios which we do see and it shows you're reliable, which makes people more inclined to send you things and if you keep working with them then, who knows, one day you may be auto-approved! I'm not allowed to do such a thing as an intern, but auto-approved members are mostly those people who have been diligently supporting a house for a while that their name just sticks out.

9. Stats are always a plus!
In your bio maybe mention stats. It can never hurt you to help us find them as opposed to making us search for them.

10. Do not get discouraged if you are denied from a title.
In the end, Netgalley is two buttons on our end. It's easy to miss a button sometimes, or sometimes we have to deny because of the limit ratio. Other times it's as simple as you being out of territory or your blog link not working. So, just keep going with it. Don't allow yourself to get discouraged. We do want you to read and review, so make sure you actually do read and review and everyone wins!

11. If you are a reviewer, say you are a reviewer.
There are several different categories for Netgalley users. Librarians, Booksellers, Educators, Media Professionals, and Reviewers. If you are a blogger, then you are a review. If you categorize yourself as a media professional you may be more likely to get denied because you aren't technically one. Just make sure you note that you are what you are and you are good!

I hope that you learned a little bit about Netgalley and this answers the 3 or 4 questions I got about Netgalley in my inbox. If you have any questions that you want answered or perhaps something you think will be a great post topic, fill out this form!

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Please do not hesitate to share your thoughts below. Do you have any other Netgalley questions? Did you learn anything from this post? What other topics do you want to see a post on?

36 comments:

  1. This is great! I love reading these post. I do have a question - do you think you need a Netgalley account for each blog? (I have two)

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    1. I think that you need to be clear with which blog is reviewing the book, so yes. If you're, say, using the stats of the bigger blog and we are approving you then we expect the review to be on that blog, not the smaller one, so I would go based off of that fact since I don't know how you run your Netgalley.

      Side note...I also blogged for 2 blogs at one point and then eventually left the 2nd to focus solely on my blog right now and had to create a new edelweiss because I had listed their blog as the sole blog since I didn't have this one at the time. So an account for both may work because if you ever leave one hopefully you have built up connections with the other?

      I can't say I have ever encountered this question, so go with your gut.

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    2. I put on there what genres go on which blog - and the my stats for the smaller one are as high, but has the same social media out reach.

      When I am contacted by publishers for a review/tour, I do ask them which they prefer, and everyone seems okay with using the smaller blog. I am just curious when it comes to Netgalley/Edelweiss. I don't know what is read on the bio - and I don't want any confusion, or for it to seem I used the larger stats to get a book. Make sense?

      Thanks for your input!

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    3. That doesn't really make much sense to me because if you clarify what goes where then what is the problem? I'm sorry if I am missing something, but I don't understand your question.

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    4. There isn't - that's what I was saying thanks for. If I specify in my bio that YA does on THIS BLOG and NA/Adult on THIS BLOG, if that was enough. I was just stating that I didn't want any confusion, there wasn't another question there, really.

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  2. Great post! I love Netgalley! I just got approved for some books by a few of my favorite authors this week, so that was pretty exciting.

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  3. Great post Lili! I love e-galleys way more than print so I really enjoy using Netgalley. I think this is your first informative post where i'm like Okay I've done all those things the right way lol. I was always curious as to who manned Netgalley on the other end. :-)
    ❤️Britt @ Please Feed The Bookworm

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    1. Hahah wooo! Always a good feeling (:

      Well, it's me and my two bosses, but I tend to spend more time in there unless they tell me I can't touch certain titles due to limits and such. I'm sure it's different for every house though.

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  4. This post gave so much insight into publishers and Netgalley! You mentioned searching for stats, and here's something I've wondered for awhile: Are you more likely to approve someone if you can see their stats proven on their blog? For example, if I say I have so many followers, but I don't have the Bloglovin' button, etc. that include follower numbers on the sidebar, would that hurt my chances of being accepted?

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    1. Okay, so, SHOWING YOUR STATS IS ALWAYS A GOOD THING. (Not caps to yell at you, just to catch people's attention if they scroll.) If they are hidden it is hard to verify them for ourselves which is not a good thing. I personally think it's always better to have them visible. Some people don't like to do that, but if we are questioning stats and they are not visible, that may hurt you then help you? It's always good to have blatant proof, really, there's just no other way to state it.

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  5. So here's a question for you. I'm currently doing some interviews and trying to get a position as a librarian. I also have a blog where I write reviews. Do you think it would be better to classify myself as a librarian or as a reviewer?

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    1. Okay, so right now you are a reviewer. You are not employed as a librarian yet therefore you simply are not a librarian. The "Librarian" part of Netgalley is manned by a different department. Example: marketing may due booksellers, publicity handles reviews and media professionals, school and library marketing are going to do educators and librarians. If you say you are a librarian and are not actually a librarian then they may not pay attention to you. A lot of the people they work with are ALA certified (from what I can tell?) so I would only make that switch with a new account or classification once you have that job and are firmly entrenched in it to the point that, yes, this is your career.

      Does that make sense? I always get worried that my answers don't make sense.

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  6. I found this incredibly helpful. I blogged daily from 2008-2010 while I was home on a disability. When I returned to work I just couldn't keep up with the blog also so I've been on hiatus. Now newly retired on a permanent disability I am back and reviewing whatever I happen to be reading. I have no experience with eARCs, but I read both nook and kindle on my iPad. I am trying to build up my stats before asking for any ARCs. Does a blogger have to be invited to request books from NetGalley?
    Hope you'll give me a visit sometime. I'd love feedback on making my blog more appealing to publishers. Everything is there going back to 2008.
    http://ebogie.blogspot.com

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    1. As I said in this post, you will have more luck with eARCs then you would ARCs, especially if you haven't been blogging a lot recently. Coming off a huge hiatus, physical ARCs probably won't be a possibility. You can just join Netgalley and start requesting titles, but be aware that as someone who hasn't blogged consistently in 4 years, it's going to be a while before you start getting approved. When you are coming off a hiatus you almost have to rebuild yourself if that makes sense.

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  7. Thank you so much for doing these posts Lili! They are really helpful. I noticed that you said to wait to put the links in your feedback until your review goes live. Is it better to submit your review immediately (without a link) and then edit it and add the link later? Or is it better to wait to submit your review when your link is live? Thanks!

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    1. Okay so someone will be on the receiving end of Netgalley reviews at every house and when feedback is updated an e-mail is submitted for that, too, so this is more a matter of opinion! I submit my review ASAP just so they can use it for quotes if necessary then update it immediately upon my review going live (as well as email it in to be safe), but that is just me personally. I think this question is really a matter of opinion.

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  8. This is really helpful. Even after three years, my blog is still small. I have only been approved for three books. Two were the BEA buzz books from last year and one was approved in advance from the publisher for a cover reveal I participated in. All my other requests have been denied saying my stats weren't good enough. So, I kind of gave up.

    Maybe I'll give it a try again.

    Tammy @ Bo's Book Nook

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    1. I mean there is no message of denial saying your stats are not good enough, so perhaps you are getting denied because your blog links don't work or you say you are in a territory that we can't accept or you are requesting as something that isn't a reviewer? There are always many reasons! Don't get discouraged! In the end, if you were not a reviewer you could not read these books in advance anyway so every approval is always a great thing!

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  9. Very interesting and insightful, thanks! I just took my Goodreads link off my netgalley profile (I have a blog), because after reading this it seems redundant. Blogs are where it's at. Thanks for this series!

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    1. Blogs are definitely where it's at!

      And no problem at all (:

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  10. I knew a lot of these already, but #6 was really helpful. I almost always submit my review long before the release date and long before my review will be posted on my blog.

    Thanks so much for another Intern Diaries post, Lili!

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    1. Yeah, the actual live link to your review is what is most helpful. A physical copy of it or a goodreads link isn't helpful.

      No problemo.

      Delete
  11. I know it's going to sound weird, but I never really think of people going and actually LOOKING at my blog when I make a request. I figure some just look at my stats, look at my ratio and make up their mind. :) Good to know that there is someone actually looking at my blog to see if I'm right for the book I'm requesting.

    I'm glad to see that I follow the majority of this advice. I remember thinking I wouldn't get approved on Netgalley because I had such a small blog, oh, I was wrong. Haha. And I'm still working on submitting reviews. :) I always read the books but then I don't always write the reviews right away, but I'm working on that.

    Great advice. :) It's very helpful hearing from an intern of a publishing company.

    --Amber

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    1. Small blog does not mean you won't be approved, it may mean that larger titles with lower limits may not be what you are approved for, but you will still be approved for things as long as you blog consistently!

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  12. Thanks for the great tips! I didn't realize that you could go back and add the review link, so I went back and updated several. Nice to know that real people are actually at the other end and it's not all automated!

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    1. I don't think netgalley could ever be automated unless the title is no longer live haha

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  13. So I am curious, on the publisher end, when you are looking at our stats for reviewing on Netgalley, can you see what percentage of our reviews were for actual approvals and how many were for "Read Now" books? My assumption has been that picking adding Read Now books would help your stas and not be detrimental, but I haven't seen anyone talk about that.

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    1. This question is not something I can answer :(

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  14. Thanks again for the insider scoop! Ash and I just started using NG pretty regularly this past year and make a point to keep our links/stats up to date as well as post our reviews!

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  15. I didn't know that number 6 was possible but I'll definitely be doing that from now on! I always try to submit reviews for every title I get approved for, regardless of it was a DNF. But I do have a couple sitting on my dashboard that I've lost interest in reading due to reviews that I've read and I haven't submitted anything because I really don't know what to say on those.

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    1. You can always go back into old reviews and edit them! As for ones that you lose interest in, state that in a respectable manner! "Unfortunately, this book did not appeal to me once I picked it up, but I look forward to giving it another chance in the future." Simple, you know?

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  16. You mentioned that as a blogger we should select reviewer in our netgalley profile? I have never done this since the "professional" threw me off. I did not want to misrepresent myself although all I do is review and post said reviews to my blog. Do you still advise selecting reviewer?

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  17. There is a chance you're eligible for a free $1,000 Amazon Gift Card.

    ReplyDelete